Wedding Traditions and History: The White Wedding Dress

Queen Victoria, 1840

Queen Victoria, circa 1840

The very first white wedding dress was worn in 1499 by Anne of Brittany, as she married Louis XII of France. Prior to this date, the bride would traditionally wear her best dress to her wedding, and in fact, the color did not matter. This was of course a more practical option because the bride could wear the dress again. The truth was that only the wealthy could afford an extravagant gown that would be worn just once. The trend of wearing a white dress never really took off until the 1840’s when Queen Victoria wore a white dress as she married Prince Albert.

Queen Elizabeth 1947

Queen Elizabeth, circa 1947

Every culture is different.  Here’s an interesting fact: in Japan, a bride wears white to symbolize that she is in mourning for having to leave her family. Later in the ceremony, the bride will change her costume several times to reflect her changing identity.

Photo courtesy e wedding inspiration

Photo courtesy e wedding inspiration

In Western culture, it’s a common misconception that wearing white is a symbol of the bride’s purity; it is in fact meant to be a symbol of joy.  The act of wearing a white wedding dress is still very much the traditional choice today, however, symbolically, they are less about the bride’s purity and more about her debut as a first time bride.

Photo by Gertrude & Mabel

Photo by Gertrude & Mabel

In case you missed it, be sure to read our last entry featuring Wedding Traditions and History: The Wedding Cake!

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Wedding Traditions and History: The Veil

Did you know, the wedding veil predates the wedding dress by hundreds of years? The word veil means to cover, obscure or mask. Furthermore, the bridal veil has been a symbol of purity and modesty for centuries.

Photo by Jose Villa

Photo by Jose Villa

Brides in ancient Rome wore a veil to cover and protect them from evil spirits. These veils were typically red and painted with flames. By concealing their face, they would hopefully frighten and confuse the spirits prior to the wedding ceremony.  These veils were also thought to protect them and keep them from being kidnapped.

Photo by Gertrude & Mabel Photography

Photo by Gertrude & Mabel Photography

One legend of the veil dates back to Isaac and Rebekah’s love story in the book of Genesis in the Hebrew Bible. Rebekah’s veil, a sign of modesty and respect, was large enough to wrap around her face and body.

Photo by Kate Webber

Photo by Kate Webber

During the days of arranged marriages, it is believed that the veil was used to keep the bride’s features hidden until the ceremony was completed. If the groom saw her before he paid the bride’s price and did not like what he saw, he could refuse to marry her.

Photo by Sasha Gulish

Photo by Sasha Gulish

Today, the veil is still an important part of the bridal attire and one of the oldest traditions to stay true to its origin. Nowadays, many brides still follow the romantic tradition of not being fully seen until her husband lifts the veil during the ceremony.

Photo by Gertrude & Mabel Photography

Photo by Gertrude & Mabel Photography

Wedding Traditions and History: Wedding Rings

How did the tradition of wearing a wedding band as a symbol that one was married begin?  The wedding ring dates back to ancient Egypt, more than 3,000 years ago.

Egyptian society saw the circular shape of the ring as a symbol of eternal love – one with no beginning and no end. Similar to present day traditions, the Egyptians wore the wedding band on their fourth finger on the left hand. Wearing a wedding ring served as a physical sealing of the marriage and a symbol of commitment. This concept has been passed down for centuries and spread throughout many cultures.

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Photo by Yvonne Wong

Unlike the more romantic Egyptians, wherein the ring symbolized love, the ancient Romans viewed the wedding ring as a symbol of possession. A woman who wore a ring signified that she was a wife who belonged to her husband.

Photo courtesy Romano Britain

Photo courtesy Romano Britain

We have the Archduke Maximillian of Austria to thank for the traditional diamond rings with which many men propose today. In 1477, the Archduke offered his beloved Mary of Burgandy a diamond as a betrothal gift – the first ever recorded diamond engagement ring.

Photo courtesy Mariana Chawi

Photo courtesy Mariana Chawi

Be sure to check out our last installment: Wedding Traditions and History: The Ring Finger.

Wedding Traditions and History: The Ring Finger

Ever wonder why we wear wedding rings on our left hand, second finger from the last?

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Throughout the various stages in history, wedding rings have been worn on different fingers.  This includes the thumb and on both the left and right hands.

According to a tradition derived from the Romans, the wedding ring was worn on the left hand (finger closest to the pinkie) because there was thought to be the primary vein running through the finger. This vein was referred to as the ‘Vena Amoris’, or the ‘Vein of Love’, which was directly connected to the heart. Sadly, scientists have now proven that the existence of such a vein is actually false. Despite the discovery, this myth is still regarded by many hopeless romantics as the number one reason wedding rings are worn on the fourth finger of the left hand.

Photo by Edyta Szyszło

Photo by Edyta Szyszło

Another Christian theory states that early marriages practiced a ritual of wearing the wedding ring on the third finger. During the ‘binding ceremony’, the priest would declare the following words: “In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.” At the same time, he would take the ring and touch the thumb, index finger, and the middle finger.  Then, while uttering “Amen”, he would place the ring on the ring finger, which sealed the marriage!

Photo by Gertrude & Mabel

Photo by Gertrude & Mabel

If you missed it, be sure to check last months Wedding Traditions and History installment on Wedding Traditions and History: The Bridal Party!

Wedding Traditions and History: The Bridal Party

This week we are taking a look at the fascinating history of the modern day Bridal Party.

Photos by Michelle McMurray

The Bridal Party: Then
Photo by Michelle McMurray

Photo by Gertrude and Mabel Photography

The Bridal Party: Now
Photo by Gertrude & Mabel

In early traditions, groomsmen were called ‘bridesknights.’  These bridesknights supported the groom by helping him capture and protect his bride. They would ride their horses to another town to kidnap the bride, and the groom’s ‘best knight’ would help fight for the groom’s love.

Drawing by Manga and Anime

The Groomsmen: Then
Drawing by Manga and Anime

The bridesknights would then oversee the safety of the bride until the wedding ceremony was over.  The best knight would stand on the Brides side so he could be next to her and protect her until they were married. This was thought to confuse the evil spirits, ensuring that no spells could be cast over the couple.

It’s safe to say that the role of the groomsmen has changed significantly over the years!  Today’s responsibilities include planning the groom’s last hurrah by way of a bachelor party, and ensuring he makes it to the church on time for the ceremony.

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The Groomsmen: Now
Photo by Gertrude & Mabel

Photo by Martin Schweig

The Bridesmaids: Then
Photo by Martin Schweig

Back in the day, bridesmaids played a very similar role to the brideknights. The bride’s closest friends would help the bride get some distance from her over-protective family and unwanted suitors so she could be captured by the groom she desired.  On her wedding day, her bridesmaids would dress similarly to the bride in an effort to throw off any evil spirits and bad luck that could be directed towards the otherwise easily identifiable bride and groom.

Laura & Jeff Wedding by Michelle Pattee

The Bridesmaids: Now
Photo by Michelle Pattee Photography

Nowadays, the maid of honor and bridesmaids are chosen specially from the bride’s close group of friends to stand beside her on the big day.  They celebrate her by planning a fabulous bachelorette party prior to the wedding, and see to it that each and every one of her needs are met while she prepares to walk down the aisle.

Traditions are so much more fun in our day and age!

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Photo by Gertrude & Mabel

Wedding Traditions and History: Marriage

Have you ever wondered about the history of marriage?

Photo by Nicole Kipar

Photo by Nicole Kipar

Many years ago the process of marriage was simple and straight forward, and in fact, a contract of sorts. Marriage took place in 2 steps:

capture and purchase.

First, the groom would gather his “bridesknights” and ride off together to another village to capture his bride.

Next he would purchase that bride, which included legal contracts involving a bride and her dowry. The bride was sold by her family for land and livestock.

Photo by Ephemera Obscura

Photo by Ephemera Obscura

Years later, arranged marriages came about. Arranged marriages united families in an effort to either gain power or change their social status. Single women had no place in society. Sadly, this was not a marriage based on love.

Unequal marriage, a 19th-century painting by Russian artist Pukirev

Unequal marriage, a 19th-century painting by Russian artist Pukirev

My, how times have changed.

Today we are blessed to have the opportunity to marry the person we fall in love with and live happily ever after!

Photo by Nirav Patel Photography

Photo by Nirav Patel Photography

Happy Valentines Day!

Credit: Elizabeth Messina

Credit: Elizabeth Messina

Fade Into You 

If you were the ocean I was the sun
If the day made me heavy and gravity won
If I was the red and you were the blue
I could just fade into you

If you were the window if I was the rain
I’d pour myself out and wash off the pain
I’d fall like the tears so you’re light could shine through
Then I’d just fade into you

In your heart in your head
In your arms in your bed
Under your skin
Till there’s no way to know
Where you end and where I begin

I was a shadow and you were a street
A cobblestone midnight is where we first meet
Till the light’s flickered out we’d dance with the moon
Then I just fade into you

In your heart in your head
In your arms in your bed
Under your skin
Till there’s no way to know
Where you end and where I begin

I want to melt i want to soak through
I only want to move when you move
I want to breathe when you breathe
then I want to fade into you

I was the ashes, you were the ground
Under your willow they lay me down
There’ll be no trace that one was once two
After I fade into you

~ feat. Sam Palladio & Clare Bowen from the show Nashville

Credit: Eva Black Design

Credit: Eva Black Design

Wishing you and yours a lovely day!

from Stacy McCain Event Planning