Get to Know… Trish Lee of Trish Lee San Francisco

Today, we are getting to know Trish Lee of Trish Lee San Francisco.  Trish’s collection of handcrafted wedding gowns (here in San Francisco!) are vintage inspired with a timeless design that shies away from the often mass produced trendy looks of today.  Abiding by the old-school mantra of great fit and quality fabric, Trish’s gowns are bespoke and unique to each and every bride.  Check out Trish’s Real Brides section on her website to see the ways in which Trish’s clients took inspiration from their heritage and passions to create the perfect dress and wedding day celebration.

~~~

Trish_Lee_Stacy_McCain

Name: Trish Lee

Company: Trish Lee San Francisco – Bespoke vintage-inspired wedding dresses and gowns for the discriminating bride

Started My Business: in 2012

Located: Mint Plaza

~~~

Q: Which industry related tool can you not live without?

 A: Double sided tape.

51jkkqeZ+yL._SY300_

Q: When you’re not on site at an event, what can we find you doing?

A: Anything at Golden Gate Park or Tradition bar.

Screen Shot 2014-06-11 at 8.25.53 AM

Q: My go to snack is ________.

A:  Yogurt, berries, walnuts, honey.

Q: What is/are your guilty pleasure(s)?

A: A big bowl of ramen with all the trimmings.

pork-belly-ramen_000051

Q: TV wise, what are you watching right now?

A: HBO Girls and Looking.

looking-season-1-poster-11x17_500

Q: I can’t stand ________.

A: Not standing for something.

Q: What’s the last thing you purchased online?

A: Face wash.

Q: Music wise, I am currently listening to ______.

A: San Francisco’s own: Tycho – the perfect melodic ambient electronic music for a long drive or to design wedding dresses, apparently!

Q: Favorite thing I currently have hanging in my closet is ______

A: My mother’s red coat. I don’t even wear it – it’s ill-fitting and the buttons are scuffed.  When my mother came to the San Francisco in the 70’s, she spent her last $50 on this double-breasted wool pea coat in poppy red, and I can’t throw it away.

Q: What’s your favorite restaurant in the Bay Area?

A: Heirloom Café, hands down.  Simple, great, unpretentious fare served in what feels like your grandma’s dining room – with the wine list of a Michelin restaurant to boot.

Photo courtesy Kaper Design

Photo courtesy Kaper Design


Q: Why are you most excited to be working with the Stacy McCain Event Planning team?

A:  They really understand people and relationships. In today’s crazy wedding world, that’s really something.

~~~

In case you missed it, be sure you Get To Know… Jillian Schiavi of Jilly Ink!

Get to Know… Jillian Schiavi of jilly ink

This month we are getting to know Jillian Schiavi, recent full time(!!) calligrapher and Oakland resident.  We think Jillian’s work is stunning and can’t wait to begin working with her!  Whether or not she should have been born in France is still undecided, however we are certain that her interests and talents will allow her to thrive in the Bay Area.

~~~

jillian schiavi

Name: Jillian Schiavi

Company: jilly ink

Started My Business: I started part-time in 2010 and made the leap to full-time last July, 2013

Located: Oakland, CA – just just relocated from Chicago, IL

~~~

Q: Which industry related tool can you not live without?

 A: Yikes! Can I pick two? I’d be lost without my Copic Multiliner pens and my right angle ruler. Cutting paper for various projects and using pens that don’t bleed when the pencil markings underneath are erased are daily occurrences for me.

copic multiliner

Q: When you’re not on site at an event, what can we find you doing?

A: You can find me either biking around my new neighborhood, exploring all the local coffee shops, farmers markets, stores, taking breaks to read in the park next to Lake Merritt, practicing yoga, or meeting with friends for dinners and wine and great conversation.

Q: At which venue are you dying to work?

A: I love working with natural elements and transforming outdoor spaces, so moving out here opens up an entirely new world of possibilities for me. Muir Woods and anywhere in wine country would be so much fun to do work.

muir woods

Q: My go to snack is ________.

A:  A peanut butter Larabar and Arbonne chocolate protein shake – those tide me over in the middle of the afternoon when I’m wading through a pile of wedding envelopes or elbow-deep in a new series of illustrations.

larabar

Q: What is/are your guilty pleasure(s)?

A: Baked goods. Give me a delicious cinnamon scone, an almond croissant, or even a freshly baked crusty baguette and I’m in heaven. I swear I should have been born in France.

Q: TV wise, what are you watching right now?

A: House of Cards, Nashville, New Girl

house-of-cards-netflix-logo

Q: I can’t stand ________.

A: People who don’t follow through, and inauthenticity.

Q: What’s the last thing you purchased online?

A: Arbonne Re-Mineralizing Body Lotion and Whitelines A4 Squared Notebooks

Q: Music wise, I am currently listening to ______.

A: Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr. and Local Natives. Love!

Q: Favorite thing I currently have hanging in my closet is ______

A: My lululemon athletica Method Wrap – I used to work there, and snatched it up pronto. Things fly out of those stores, so you’ve gotta grab it right when you see it!

lululemon method wrap

Q: What’s your favorite restaurant in the Bay Area?

A: So far it’s a toss up between Delfina and Out the Door.

restaurant_otd

Q: Why are you most excited to be working with the Stacy McCain Event Planning team?

A: I’m thrilled to begin working with the team – it’s evident that the group is made up of organized, creative, fun and engaging ladies, and I can’t wait to collaborate!

~~~

As an introduction gift to the Bay Area and California, Jillian is offering a 10% discount on all wedding lettering services through the end of May to all west coast couples.  Please contact Jillian for more information { jillian.schiavi@gmail.com }

~~~

In case you missed it, be sure you Get to Know… Lindsay Jernegan of Frances Lane!

2013 Trends: Printed Pieces with Olivia San Mateo of Olive Route

They say that first impressions are everything, and Olivia San Matoe of Olive-Route would be the first to agree.  She always keeps this in mind when designing and creating her beautiful printed pieces for weddings and special events.  As save-the-dates and invitations are the guests’ first impression of the celebration to come, it’s important that the pieces be memorable and unique to the couple.  In this interview, Olivia shares her expertise on the various options and processes that go along with creating specialty paper goods.
OR-logo

Please tell us a bit about your company, Olive-Route. How did you come up with the name and logo?

Olive-Route is a custom design and letterpress studio that I started in 2005 after purchasing my first letterpress machine. My portfolio is a collection of wedding paper goods, small business collateral, and art collaborations. My company name is a combination of the latin meaning of my name: “Olivia” means olive tree and my nickname “Via” means route. The logo was something I developed when I was still in design school and I just carried it through my professional career.

When it comes to creating invitations and other printed pieces for couples planning their wedding, what’s your specialty?  

I specialize mainly in letterpress printed pieces – that’s where my heart is. But besides being a printer I’m also a designer, and will specify other types of printing (digital, foil, etc.) if it makes sense for the design and budget.

What makes you stand out from other design studios?

I’d like to think my designs help me stand out from other studios. Everything I do is custom, so every project is unique and I rarely reprint a design. I always make variations and like to experiment with different styles.

In your opinion, why are printed pieces so important in the grand scheme of the wedding?

Invites and Save-the-Dates help set the tone of the wedding. And since they’re sent out early, the first design decisions have to be made when they get sent out (the color palette, the motifs, the overall look and feel, etc). The day of pieces such as programs, menus, placecards, etc. become wonderful keepsakes and takeaways for the guests.  Not only are they functional, they’re also fun and unique. Here are a few samples that have a variety of paper goods in the set, the first set from a Stacy McCain Event Planning wedding for Rachel and Blake, at Cavallo Point.

Photo by Heather and Carol for Gertrude and Mabel

Photo by Heather and Carol for Gertrude & Mabel

Photo by Heather and Carol for Gertrude and Mabel

Photo by Heather and Carol for Gertrude & Mabel

Photo by Heather and Carol for Gertrude and Mabel

Photo by Heather and Carol for Gertrude & Mabel

Photo by Heather and Carol for Gertrude and Mabel

Photo by Heather and Carol for Gertrude & Mabel

Photo by Thayer Gowdy

Photo by Heather and Carol for Gertrude & Mabel

Second Set:

Photo by Thayer Gowdy

Photo by Thayer Gowdy

Photo by Thayer Gowdy

Photo by Thayer Gowdy

Photo by Thayer Gowdy

Photo by Thayer Gowdy

Photo by Thayer Gowdy

Photo by Thayer Gowdy

Third Set:

Photo by B&N Photography

Photo by B&N Photography

Photo by B&N Photography

Photo by B&N Photography

Photo by B&N Photography

Photo by B&N Photography

Photo by B&N Photography

Photo by B&N Photography

Photo by B&N Photography

Photo by B&N Photography

Photo by B&N Photography

Photo by B&N Photography

Fourth Set:

Photo by Thayer Gowdy

Photo by Thayer Gowdy

Photo by Thayer Gowdy

Photo by Thayer Gowdy

Photo by Thayer Gowdy

Photo by Thayer Gowdy

At what point during the planning process do engaged couples come your way?

I encourage them to come very early on, usually about a year out, since save-the-dates are typically sent out at least 6 months from the wedding date.

What’s the best time frame for the creative process to begin, and what is the typical turnaround?

My process is broken down into two phases: design and production.  Each takes about 4 weeks, so 8 weeks total from start to finish.

How do you begin the process of creating custom wedding suites for your couples?

We usually start with a phone conversation or a meet and greet. I like to get to know my clients and understand their aesthetic and style choices so I can better customize the design for them. Then I ask them for any inspiration they may have collected or take a peek at their Pinterest board if they have one. Once I get a better understanding of who they are and what they like, I put together my own style board featuring all the details of their paper goods. The board will consist of color, typography, image, and material inspirations.

Keeping in mind that each couple and wedding is different, how much should couples plan to spend on their printed pieces?

There’s a huge range when it comes to the amount spent on paper goods. It really depends on how important it is to the couple and how they want it printed.  Digital printing is always less expensive than letterpress.

Which components of a suite would you say are most necessary?

I think that when working within a budget, it’s nice to have the invite card printed letterpress and maybe opt for the enclosures to be digital. I always encourage having the addresses done in calligraphy, but if it’s not in the budget, ask someone you know who has nice handwriting to do it for you. Finding some vintage stamps also adds a nice touch. I think whatever you can do to make it look more personalized is worth the effort.

Can you explain the differences in paper weight?

In simplest terms, I always refer to cardstock in 1ply vs. 2ply. Letterpress is always best on thicker 2ply stock, but that also adds to the cost. So if you want to save some money but want to stick with letterpress, going 1ply is a good alternative.

In your experience, what are the most common printing practices?

I mainly provide letterpress and digital services. I’ll also use foil, which is similar to letterpress but instead of ink we use foil.  This works best for metallic colors like gold or silver. Here are some examples:

Letterpress has a nice textural quality to the printing:

Calligraphy by Nancy Hopkins

Photo by Olivia San Mateo; Calligraphy by Nancy Hopkins

Digital is flat printing and works great with saturated colors such as this example:

Photo by Angie Silvy Photography

Photo by Angie Silvy Photography

Here’s an example of foil printing on cloth and wood paper:

OR-23

Photo by Olivia San Mateo

What concepts did we see a lot of in 2012, that we are seeing less in 2013?

I would say patterns have been big and are still running strong, which I love!

Can you tell us about some exciting new concepts you’ve rolled out in 2013?

I’ve integrated some bookbinding into some of my 2013 custom projects like these custom folios with wax seals:

OR-32

Photo by Olivia San Mateo

I love lots of texture, so anywhere I can mix and match materials is great. I love the liner on this design as well as the wallpaper backing we used for the invite:

OR-33

Photo by Olivia San Mateo

I also love pops of color as seen on these bright edge-painted cards:

OR-34

Photo by Olivia San Mateo

Thanks for all the inspiration, Olivia!

Follow Olivia on Tumblr, Pinterest and Instagram

In case you missed it, be sure to read our September installment of Trends, featuring Wedding Ceremonies with Lisa Francesca

The Art of Addressing Invitations

A couple weeks ago, we talked to you about the etiquette of invitations, so you now know everything about timing and who to invite and how. Then, we featured the lovely ladies from A Day In May Design in our Vendor Spotlight, as they shared their beautiful work. And earlier this week, our friends over at Wedding Paper Divas offered our readers a very special deal. So maybe you’ve just chosen your invitations, or perhaps you’re about to get them back from the printers and are ready to send those suckers out. But wait! What about addressing the envelopes? Gotta make sure you get that part right, and we’re here to show you how.

One common question we always get is, “Do we have to hand-write every single one of those addresses??” The short answer is yes, although the “rules” have become more relaxed, if you’re going to follow proper etiquette, the envelope that your invitation arrives in should be hand-addressed (plus, that’s more personal!) Brides often breathe a sigh of relief when we tell them that they don’t actually have to do it themselves. You can hire a calligrapher who will do a beautiful job making the outside of your envelope look just as lovely as what’s inside! (Michele Papineau Calligraphy graciously shared the samples in this post with us.)

You’d have to provide your calligrapher with a well-organized list of names with proper titles and full addresses.

Proper titles?? Yes, you read that right. If you’re inviting a single guest, write “and Guest” after the person’s name. Our recommendation is if you know who they will be bringing, actually write their full name, on a separate line. What do you do if guests have professional titles, like Dr.? What about when a married couple has different last names? And what if you’re inviting children? Check out these, and other, nuances here.

If you’re going to include inner envelopes and outer envelopes, here’s a good guide to help you address each appropriately.

What about the return address? Well, for this, since the address will always be the same, we say it would be fine if you gave your hand a break and used either a stamp or printed on the envelope.

And we know we already covered this in a previous post, but when you’re ready to assemble that invitation, make sure you do it right. 

For those of you that are still at the invitations step and need some help with wording, see these tips from Martha, or this wording wizard.

We understand that this part of the wedding planning process might be frustrating/tedious/perplexing/[insert lip-biting emotion here], so we’re here to answer any of your questions. Please ask away- we’re here to help! And if you’re so excited by how your invitations/envelopes came out, please do share them with us- we’d love to see!!

{All images above from Gertrude and Mabel Photography. Envelopes addressed by Michele Papineau Calligraphy.}